More strikes ‘inevitable’ in NSW as government ramps up anti-union rhetoric | Industrial relations | The Guardian

More strikes ‘inevitable’ in NSW as government ramps up anti-union rhetoric | Industrial relations | The Guardian

“The NSW federal government is spitting the dummy and trying to make a point,” the RTBU secretary, Alex Claassens, said.While the government implicated the union of taking politically determined industrial action, Elliotts interventions on Monday were revealing in terms of his own focus.01:20 Neither his 2GB interview or the snap press conference– which some media were not signaled to– were held with transport authorities who could have explained, for example, what contingency steps had been carried out to help commuters during the shutdown of the network.Nor was the federal government able to describe– beyond citing the safety issues of those very same missing transport officials– why the network needed to be quickly shut down when the union had actually publicised its intent to take minimal commercial action as early as Wednesday last week.Indeed Perrottet was asked on Monday on whether the shutdown was a copy of Qantas choice in 2011 to ground its fleet in the middle of a commercial disagreement, an action which triggered the Fair Work Commission to end the employees action since of the danger to the economy.”To deliberately shut down the rail network on such a big day for numerous individuals, apparently so they can run a fear project about unions, is rather amazing,” Claassens said.But despite the unpleasant handling of the disagreement, the governments decision to lash out at the union on Monday is revealing.It is certainly real that with a federal election looming and the next NSW election only 12 months away, the union motion is flexing its muscle. Unions NSW boss Mark Morey was on the front page of the Daily Telegraph on Monday stating 2022 would be the year of the strike if the government declined to ditch its 2.5% wages cap.It was less than a week ago that the states nurses were holding their very first state-wide strike in nearly a decade outside the states parliament, and teachers and bus motorists have also flagged their intent to carry out more commercial action.The NSW Public Services Association secretary, Stewart Little, stated his union– which represents jail employees, some education personnel and a variety of other public sector workers– would likewise consider taking protected action if the state federal government moved to reverse Covid-era workers compensation laws.Little also stated getting rid of the 2.5% wages cap– which has actually been in location since the NSW Liberal federal government came into power in 2011– had taken on a new urgency for unions in the middle of increasing job pressures throughout the pandemic, as well as inflation and increased cost of living pressures.

“The NSW government is spitting the dummy and attempting to make a point,” the RTBU secretary, Alex Claassens, said.While the government implicated the union of taking politically determined commercial action, Elliotts interventions on Monday were revealing in terms of his own focus.01:20 Neither his 2GB interview or the snap press conference– which some media were not alerted to– were held with transport authorities who could have discussed, for example, what contingency steps had been executed to assist commuters throughout the shutdown of the network.Nor was the government able to describe– beyond pointing out the safety issues of those same missing transportation authorities– why the network required to be abruptly shut down when the union had actually publicised its intent to take minimal commercial action as early as Wednesday last week.Indeed Perrottet was asked on Monday on whether the shutdown was a copy of Qantas decision in 2011 to ground its fleet amidst a commercial dispute, an action which triggered the Fair Work Commission to terminate the workers action since of the danger to the economy.”To intentionally shut down the rail network on such a big day for numerous individuals, seemingly so they can run a fear campaign about unions, is quite amazing,” Claassens said.But despite the messy handling of the disagreement, the federal governments choice to lash out at the union on Monday is revealing.It is certainly true that with a federal election looming and the next NSW election just 12 months away, the union motion is bending its muscle. Unions NSW manager Mark Morey was on the front page of the Daily Telegraph on Monday declaring 2022 would be the year of the strike if the federal government refused to scrap its 2.5% salaries cap.It was less than a week ago that the states nurses were holding their very first state-wide strike in nearly a decade outside the states parliament, and teachers and bus chauffeurs have actually likewise flagged their intention to carry out more commercial action.The NSW Public Services Association secretary, Stewart Little, said his union– which represents jail employees, some education personnel and a range of other public sector workers– would also consider taking secured action if the state federal government moved to rescind Covid-era employees payment laws.Little likewise stated eliminating the 2.5% wages cap– which has actually been in location because the NSW Liberal federal government came into power in 2011– had taken on a brand-new seriousness for unions in the middle of increasing task pressures throughout the pandemic, as well as inflation and increased expense of living pressures.


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