Landmark Colombian bird study repeated to right colonial-era wrongs


Birds of Colombia: leading, many-banded araçari (Pteroglossus pluricinctus); left, pileated finch (Coryphospingus pileatus); right, white-fringed antwren (Formicivora grisea). Credit: Andrés M. Cuervo

Rather, regional researchers will keep specimens in Colombia and engage with local communities during their expeditions, to include them in the memorable endeavour, enhance the quality of the research and set an ethical requirement for future fieldwork.Chapman and at least 5 other collectors shot many of the nearly 16,000 birds that they transported back to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, offering regional citizens little description– or credit. “You wouldnt like it if I came to your house, surveyed it without approval, took images and then went back to Colombia without telling you what I had discovered,” says Nelsy Niño-Rodríguez, the Colombia Resurvey Projects community-relations coordinator, who is an ornithologist at the Alexander von Humboldt Biological Resources Research Institute in Bogotá. Without local guides well-informed about Colombia and its birds, Chapman couldnt potentially have actually located and collected so numerous specimens, says Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela, a research study partner on the resurvey project and a conservation ecologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz. And climate modification has pressed birds to greater elevations and changed their migratory patterns.Seeking to understand the effects of these modifications on biodiversity, scientists introduced the Colombia Resurvey Project in 2019. Locations formerly ruled by FARC guerrillas are now falling under the control of other armed groups, which may not let outsiders in, so local residents might soon be the only people who have access to some of Colombias the majority of biodiverse jungles and the birds that populate them.

They are saving the specimens at the National University of Colombia, where the birds will be digitally catalogued, so that individuals can view them online, listen to audio of their song and scroll through interactive maps of the expeditions. “Although the Chapman exploration was performed with aid and consents from the Colombian government, todays explorations appropriately look much various than they did in Chapmans time,” says a museum spokesperson, including that the museum “is proud of the extremely active relationship it maintains with Colombias clinical organizations through education and research study”. Areas previously ruled by FARC guerrillas are now falling under the control of other armed groups, which may not let outsiders in, so regional residents might soon be the only individuals who have access to some of Colombias many biodiverse jungles and the birds that occupy them.

Resurvey job scientists Jessica Diaz (right) and Andrés Sierra (left) record data from a mist net, used to collect birds throughout expeditions.Credit: Andrés M. Cuervo

Chapman visited Colombia because he believed that its geography made it one of the most biodiverse locations in the world. He theorized that the presence of the Andes Mountains, combined with the countrys position bridging South and Central America, made it an evolutionary melting pot.Although Colombia is still house to around 10% of the worlds biodiversity, the forests when explored by Chapman have actually changed tremendously. And climate change has actually pressed birds to higher elevations and changed their migratory patterns.Seeking to understand the effects of these changes on biodiversity, researchers introduced the Colombia Resurvey Project in 2019.

Ornithologist Andrés Cuervo takes a selfie of a group of Colombia Resurvey Task researchers throughout an expedition in Caquetá.Credit: Andrés M. Cuervo

Instead, regional scientists will keep specimens in Colombia and engage with regional neighborhoods during their expeditions, to include them in the memorable endeavour, enhance the quality of the research and set an ethical standard for future fieldwork.Chapman and at least 5 other collectors shot numerous of the nearly 16,000 birds that they transported back to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, offering local homeowners little explanation– or credit. “You would not like it if I came to your house, surveyed it without authorization, took photos and then went back to Colombia without telling you what I had discovered,” states Nelsy Niño-Rodríguez, the Colombia Resurvey Projects community-relations planner, who is an ornithologist at the Alexander von Humboldt Biological Resources Research Institute in Bogotá. Without regional guides educated about Colombia and its birds, Chapman could not possibly have situated and gathered so many specimens, states Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela, a research study partner on the resurvey task and a conservation ecologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Post